Expanding global access to genetic therapies

Expanding global access to genetic therapies
AWT Muigai, School of Biological Sciences, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya
World View, Published: 07 January 2022
Nature Biotechnology, 40, pages 20–21 (2022)
[Excerpt]
…The era of genetic therapies — both gene-editing treatments and gene therapies, several of which are now on the market — has arrived for rare disease. But as more of these therapies come online, it is time to explore how current business models based on patents and restrictive licensing limit access to treatments. It is also time to explore whether there are other ways in which patents can still reward innovators and protect investments while ensuring that the widest number of patients who need these treatments can receive them…

Comparison of public discussions of gene editing on social media between the United States and China

Comparison of public discussions of gene editing on social media between the United States and China
J Ji, M Robbins, JD Featherstone, C Calabrese… –
PloS ONE,  Published: May 2, 2022, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0267406
Abstract
The world’s first gene-edited babies event has stirred controversy on social media over the use of gene editing technology. Understanding public discussions about this controversy will provide important insights about opinions of science and facilitate informed policy decisions. This study compares public discussion topics about gene editing on Twitter and Weibo, as well as the evolution of these topics over four months. Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) was used to generate topics for 11,244 Weibo posts and 57,525 tweets from September 25, 2018, to January 25, 2019. Results showed a difference between the topics on Twitter versus Weibo: there were more nuanced discussions on Twitter, and the discussed topics between platforms focused on different areas. Temporal analysis showed that most discussions took place around gene-edited events. Based on our findings, suggestions were provided for policymakers and science communication practitioners to develop more effective communication strategies toward audiences in China and the U.S.

Balancing openness with Indigenous data sovereignty: An opportunity to leave no one behind in the journey to sequence all of life

Balancing openness with Indigenous data sovereignty: An opportunity to leave no one behind in the journey to sequence all of life
AM Mc Cartney, J Anderson, L Liggins, et al.
Perspective, Evolution
PNAS, January 18, 2022, 119 (4) e2115860119
Abstract
The field of genomics has benefited greatly from its “openness” approach to data sharing. However, with the increasing volume of sequence information being created and stored and the growing number of international genomics efforts, the equity of openness is under question. The United Nations Convention of Biodiversity aims to develop and adopt a standard policy on access and benefit-sharing for sequence information across signatory parties. This standardization will have profound implications on genomics research, requiring a new definition of open data sharing. The redefinition of openness is not unwarranted, as its limitations have unintentionally introduced barriers of engagement to some, including Indigenous Peoples. This commentary provides an insight into the key challenges of openness faced by the researchers who aspire to protect and conserve global biodiversity, including Indigenous flora and fauna, and presents immediate, practical solutions that, if implemented, will equip the genomics community with both the diversity and inclusivity required to respectfully protect global biodiversity.